Buddhist thought says that, “when someone harms us, they create the cause of their own suffering. They do this by strengthening habits that imprison them in a cycle of pain and confusion. It’s not that we are responsible for what someone else does, and certainly not that we should feel guilty. But when they harm us, we unintentionally become the means of their undoing. Had they looked on us with loving-kindness, however, we’d be the cause of their gathering virtue.

What’s true for them is also true for us. The way we regard those who hurt us today will affect how we experience the world in the future. We also have a choice: we can strengthen our resentment or our understanding and empathy. We can widen the gap between ourselves and others or lessen it…”
So is it good to take revenge? To hit someone where they live? To give them a dose of their own medicine? Apparently not, according to above.

Everyone else is always a perfect mirror reflection of where we are ourselves in our journey. If you want to know how evolved you are, look at your mate. And looking at the world today, violence is everywhere (where on the killing fields or in the privacy of our own minds). There is no killing that goes un-avenged. If we “take out” all of ISIS, won’t they have sons and daughters that will want to avenge their deaths too? We’re not saying, let them continue their crimes against humanity, but we still have to understand cause and effect. If we started to deal with the root cause of these problems; a lack of both education and understanding, we might prevent further radicalization.

What goes around comes around.
No matter who is right or wrong.
If there is such a thing.

Coach Jo